Biography of Dean

Biography

 

Kwang Chul Kim, Ph.D.
Professor and Dean

Myungsung Medical College

P.O. Box 14972

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Email: mucuskim@gmail.com
Cell: +251 99 394 7119

Personal

Name: Kwang Chul Kim

Date of Birth & Place: March 6, 1947 & Seoul, Korea

Marital Status: married

Nationality: U.S.A.

Education 

1972 B.S. (Pharmacy), Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea

1974 M.S. (Medicine), Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea

1979 Ph.D. (Pharmacology), Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio

1984 Postdoctoral research (Lung Cell Biology), NIEHS, RTP, NC

Professional Experience

1966-68      Medical Specialist in Republic-of-Korea Army

1975-79      Graduate Teaching/Research Associate, Ohio State University, College of Pharmacy, Columbus, OH

1980-81      Postdoctoral Fellow, Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), Research Triangle Park, NC

1982-83      Postdoctoral Fellow, Laboratory of Pulmonary Function and Toxicology, NIH, NIEHS, Research Triangle Park, NC

1984           Visiting Scientist, W. Alton Jones Cell Science Center, Lake Placid, NYAssistant Professor, Department of Medicine and Department of Pharmacology, Boston University, School of Medicine,                            Boston, MA

1990           Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Maryland at Baltimore, School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD

1992           Associate Professor (tenured), Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland Baltimore, School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD

2000           Professor of Pharmacy and Medicine (tenured), Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Department of Medicine, University of Maryland Baltimore, MD

2006-08     Senior Scientist, Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, New Mexico; Adjunct Professor, Department of Medicine (Pathology), University of New Mexico, School of Medicine,                             Albuquerque, NM

2009-14      Professor (tenured) of Physiology and Director of Lung mucus research program, Center for Inflammation, Translational and Clinical Lung Research, Temple University School of Medicine,                                Philadelphia, PA

2015-18      Professor (tenured) and Director, Respiratory Mucus Research Program, Departments of Otolaryngology (primary), Medicine and Physiology, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson,                        AZ

2017-now   Visiting Professor, National Key Laboratory of Respiratory Diseases, Guangzhou, China

2018            Visiting Professor, Myungsung Medical College, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

2018-now   Research Professor, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ

2020-now    Professor and Dean, Myungsung Medical College, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Professional Service

Members of Research Grant Review Committees:

National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, NIH

Lung Cellular Molecular Immunobiology (LCMI) study sectiona (regular, 2004-2008)

Lung Biology and Pathology and LCMI study sections (ad hoc)

NIH research grant review members (Special Emphasis Panels) (ad hoc)

Flight Attendant Medical Research Institute (FAMRI) (ad hoc)

Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (ad hoc)

Philip Morris External Research Program (regular) (2003- )

American Lung Association (regular)(1993-1995)

California Tobacco-Related Disease Research Program (regular) (1993-1998) a “study section” is a special committee consisting of about 15 experts in the field to scientifically evaluate and decide the recipients of the federal research grants and is appointed by the NIH (National Institutes of Health) for a 4 years term.

Editorial board:

American Journal of Clinical and Experimental Immunology (2012 – )

American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology (2009 -2015)

American Journal of Physiology (Lung Cell and Molecular Physiology) (1994 – 2000)

Archives of Pharmacal Research(1996 – )

Manuscript reviewer for:

American Journal of Physiology (Lung Cell. and Mol. Physiology)

American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology

American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

American Journal of Pathology

American Journal of Rhinology and Allergy

Chest

Archives of Pharmacal Research

Experimental Lung Research

Cancer Research

Epithelial Cell Biology

Experimental Cell Research

Immunity

Journal of Biological Chemistry

Journal of Clinical Investigation

Journal of Immunology
Journal of Pharmacological Sciences

Proceedings of National Academy of Science (PNAS)

Society Membership

American Thoracic Society

American Physiological Society

American Society of Cell Biology
European Respiratory Society

RESEARCH

Publications

  1. Kim KC, Hong SA, Park CW (1974) Studies on cardiotonic effect of aconiti tuber. The New Medical Journal 16:1391-1408.
  2. Kim KC (1979) Dopaminergic influences on prolactin synthesis and release from rat anterior pituitary cultures. Doctoral thesis. Ohio State University.
  3. Kim KC, Burkman AM (1981) Prolactin release from anterior pituitary cell culture following medium replacement. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 167:551-553.
  4. Sugino A, Kojo H, Greenberg BD, Brown PO, Kim KC (1981) In vitro replication of yeast 2-µm plasmid DNA. In: Initiation of DNA Replication (DS Ray, ed.), Academic Press, New York, pp. 529-553.
  5. Kim KC, Burkman AM (1982) Haloperidol causes irreversible damage to rat anterior pituitary lactotropes in culture. Res Commun Chem Pathol Pharmacol 36:179-185.
  6. Arendes J, Kim KC, Sugino A (1983) Yeast 2-µm plasmic DNA replication in vitro: Purification of the CDC8 gene product by complementation assay.  Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 80:673-677.
  7. Sugino A, Sakai A, Wilson-Coleman F, Arendes J, Kim KC (1983) In vitro reconstitution of yeast 2-µm plasmid DNA replication. In: Mechanisms of DNA Replication and Recombination (NR Cozzarelli, ed.), Alan R. Liss, Inc., pp. 527-552.
  8. Kim KC (1985) Possible requirement of collagen gel substratum for production of mucin-like glycoproteins by primary rabbit tracheal epithelial cells in culture. In Vitro Cell Dev Biol 21:617-621.
  9. Kim KC, Rearick JI, Nettesheim P, Jetten AM (1985) Biochemical characterization of mucous glycoproteins synthesized and secreted by hamster tracheal epithelial cells in primary culture. J Biol Chem 260:4021-4027.
  10. Kim KC, Wasano K, Niles RM, Schuster JE, Stone PJ, Brody JS (1987) Human neutrophil elastase releases cell surface mucins from primary cultures of hamster tracheal epithelial cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 84:9304-9308.
  11. Niles R, Kim KC, Hyman B, Christensen T, Wasano K, Brody J (1988) Characterization of extended primary and secondary cultures of hamster tracheal epithelial cells. In Vitro Cell Dev Biol 24:457-463.
  12. Wasano K, Kim KC, Niles RM, Brody JS (1988) Membrane differentiation markers of airway epithelial secretory cells. J Histochem Cytochem 36:167-178.
  13. Kim KC, Brody JS (1989) Use of primary cell culture to study regulation of airway surface epithelial mucus secretion. Symp Soc Exp Biol 43:231-239.
  14. Kim KC, Opaskar-Hincman H, Bhaskar KR (1989) Secretions from primary hamster tracheal epithelial cells in culture: Mucin-like glycoproteins, proteoglycans, and lipids. Exp Lung Res 15:299-314.
  15. Kim KC, Nassiri J, Brody JS (1989) Mechanisms of airway goblet cell mucin release: Studies with cultured primary tracheal surface epithelial cells. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 1:137-143.
  16. Adler KB, Cheng PW, Kim KC (1990) Characterization of guinea pig tracheal epithelial cells maintained in biphasic organotypic culture: Cellular composition and biochemical analysis of released glycoconjugates. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 2:145-154.
  17. Kim KC, Singh BN (1990) Hydrophobicity of mucin-like glycoproteins secreted by cultured tracheal epithelial cells: Association with lipids. Exp Lung Res 16:279-292.
  18. Kim KC, Singh BN (1990) Association of lipids with mucins may take place prior to secretion: Studies with primary tracheal epithelial cells in culture. Biorheology 27:491-501.
  19. Kim KC (1991) Mucin-like glycoproteins secreted from cultured hamster tracheal surface epithelial cells: Their hydrophobic nature and amino acid composition. Exp Lung Res 17:65-76.
  20. Kim KC (1991) Biochemistry and pharmacology of mucin-like glycoproteins produced by cultured airway epithelial cells. Exp Lung Res 17:533-545.
  21. Kim KC (1991) Airway goblet cell mucins. Medical Science of Korea 23:13-21.
  22. Kim KC, Lee BC (1991) P2 purinoceptor regulation of mucin release by airway goblet cells in primary culture. Br J Pharmacol 103:1053-1056.
  23. Kim KC (1992) Cellular and biochemical mechanisms of airway epithelial mucin release. In: Signal Transduction in Lung Cells (JS Brody, V Tkachuk, D Center, eds), Lung Biology in Health and Disease, Vol. 65, Marcel Dekker, Inc., New York, pp. 309-321.
  24. Kim KC, Wilson AK, Lee BC (1992) Nucleotides and mucin release from cultured airway epithelial cells. Chest 101:68S-69S.
  25. Kim KC (1993) Mechanisms of airway goblet cell mucin release by nucleotides. In: Proceedings of First International Symposium on New Trends in Pharmaceutical Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea, pp. 27-32.
  26. Kim KC, Zheng QX, Brody JS (1993) Effect of floating a gel matrix on mucin release in cultured airway epithelial cells. J Cell Physiol 156:480-486.
  27. Kim KC, Zheng QX, Van Seuningen I (1993) Involvement of a signal transduction mechanism in ATP-induced mucin release from cultured airway goblet cells. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 8:121-125.
  28. Kim KC (1994) Regulation of airway goblet cell mucin secretion. In: Airway Secretion: Physiological Bases for the Control of Mucus Hypersecretion (T Takishima, S Shimura, eds.), Lung Biology in Health and Disease, Vol. 72, Marcel Dekker, Inc., New York, pp. 433-449.
  29. Kim KC, Zheng QX, Wilson AK, Lee BC, Berman JS (1994) Binding kinetics of ATPg-S35 on cultured primary tracheal surface epithelial cell. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 10: 154-159.
  30. Kim KC, McCracken K, Shin CY, Jo MJ, Lee CJ, Ko KH (1996) Regulation of airway goblet cell mucin. In: Airway mucus, Seoul National University, pp. 63-71.
  31. Kim KC, Park HR, Shin CY, Akiyama T, Ko KH (1996) Nucleotide-induced mucin release primary hamster tracheal surface epithelial cells involves P2u Eur Respir J 9:542-548.
  32. Park HR, Hyun SW, Kim KC (1996) Expression of MUC1 mucin gene by hamster tracheal surface epithelial cells in primary culture. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 15:237-244.
  33. Ko KH, Jo M, McCraken K, Kim KC (1997) ATP-induced mucin release from cultured airway goblet cells involves, in part, activation of protein kinase C. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 16:194-198.
  34. Kim KC, McCracken K, Lee BC, Shin CY, Jo MJ, Lee CJ, Ko KH (1997) Airway goblet cell mucin: Its structure and regulation of secretion. Eur Respir J 10:2644-2649.
  35. Paul E, Lee DI, Hyun SW, Gendler S, Kim KC (1998) Identification and characterization of high molecular-mass mucin-like glycoproteins in the plasma membrane of airway epithelial cells. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 19:681-690.
  36. Shin CY, Choi EY, Kim KC, Ko KH (1998) Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against rat tracheal mucins. Hybridoma 17: 257-266.
  37. Shin CY, Kang SJ, Kim KC, Ko KH (1998) Comparison between ELISA and gel-filtration assay for the quantitation of airway mucins. Arch Pharm Res 21:253-259.
  38. Jo M, Shin CY, Song MR, Park KH, Seo DO, Choi EY, Kim KC, Ko KH (1999) A monoclonal antibody against hamster tracheal mucin, which recognizes N-acetyl-galactosamine containing carbohydrate chains as an epitope. Hybridoma 18:449-456.
  39. Kim KC, Gleich GJ, Lee MK (1999) Two eosinophil granule proteins, eosinophil peroxidase and major basic protein, inhibit mucin release from airway goblet cells. Inflamm Res 48:314-317.
  40. Ko KH, Lee CJ, Shin CY, Jo M, Kim KC (1999) Inhibition of mucin release from airway goblet cells by polycationic peptides. Am J Physiol 277:L811-815.
  41. Rounds S, Likar LL, Harrington EO, Kim KC, Smeglin A, Heins K, Parks N (1999) Nucleotide-induced PMN adhesion to cultured epithelial cells: Possible role of MUC1. Am J Physiol 277:L874-L880.
  42. Meerzaman D, Xing PX, Kim KC (2000) Construction and characterization of a chimeric receptor containing the cytoplasmic domain of MUC1 mucin. Am J Physiol 278:L625-L629.
  43. Shin CY, Kim KC, Lee WJ, Jo MJ, Park KH, Dalby R, Ko KH (2000) Inhaled ATP causes mucin release from goblet cells of intact rats. Exp Lung Res 26:1-11.
  44. Shin CY, Park KH, Ryu BK, Choi EY, Kim KC, Ko KH (2000) Squamous differentiation downregulates Muc1 mucin in hamster tracheal surface epithelial cell. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 271:641-646.
  45. Kim KC, Hyun SW, Kim BT, Meerzaman D, Lee MK, Lillehoj E (2001) Pseudomonas adhesion to MUC1 mucins: A potential role of MUC1 mucins in clearance of inhaled bacteria. In: Cilia, Mucus and Mucociliary Interactions (M Salathe, ed.), Marcel Dekker, Inc., pp. 217-224.
  46. Lillehoj EP, Hyun SW, Kim BT, Zhang XG, Lee DI, Rowland S, Kim KC (2001) Muc1 mucins on the cell surface are adhesion sites for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 280:L181-L187.
  47. Meerzaman D, Shapiro PS, Kim KC (2001) Involvement of the MAP kinase ERK2 in MUC1 mucin signaling. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 281:L86-L91.
  48. Park Y, Shin CY, Lee WJ, Jo MJ, Ryu JR, Choi EY, Kim KC, Ko KH (2001) Immunological characterization of a mucin-associated protein from hamster tracheal epithelial cell culture. Hybridoma 20:123-129.
  49. Shin CY, Jo MJ, Lee WJ, Ryu JR, Kim KC, Ko KH (2001) ATP-induced mucin release from cultured airway goblet cell involves, in part, activation of phospholipase A2. Methods Find Exp Clin Pharmacol 23:73-77.
  50. Lee CJ, Paik SH, Ko KH, Kim KC (2002) Effects of polycationic peptide on mucin release from airway goblet cells: Relationship between the polymer size and the activity. Inflamm Res 51:490-494.
  51. Lillehoj EP, Kim BT, Kim KC (2002) Identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa flagellin as an adhesin for Muc1 mucin. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol. Physiol 282:L751-L756.
  52. Lillehoj EP, Kim KC (2002) Airway mucus: Its components and function. Arch Pharm Res 25:770-780.
  53. Kim KC, Hisatsune A, Kim DJ, Miyata T (2003) Pharmacology of airway goblet cell mucin release. J Pharmacol Sci 92:301-307.
  54. Kim KC, Lee BC, Pou S, Ciccolella D (2003) Effects of activation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes on airway goblet cell mucin release in a co-culture system. Inflamm Res 52:258-262.
  55. Lee IJ, Hyun SW, Nandi A, Kim KC (2003) Transcriptional regulation of the hamster Muc1 gene: Identification of a putative negative regulatory element. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 284:L160-L168.
  56. Lillehoj EP, Han F, Kim KC (2003) Mutagenesis of a Gly-Ser cleavage site in MUC1 inhibits ectodomain shedding. Biochem Biophys Res Comm 307:743-749.
  57. Wang HH, Lillehoj EP, Kim KC (2003) Identification of four sites of stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation in the MUC1 cytoplasmic tail. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 310:341-346.
  58. Hisatsune A, Hyun SW, Lee IJ, Georas SN, Kim KC (2004) YY1 transcription factor is not responsible for the negative regulation of hamster Muc1 Anticancer Res 24:235-240.
  59. Lee IJ, Han F, Baek J, Hisatsune A, Kim KC (2004) Inhibition of MUC1 expression by indole-3-carbinol. Int J Cancer 109:810-816.
  60. Lillehoj EP, Kim H, Chun EY, Kim KC (2004) Pseudomonas aeruginosa stimulates phosphorylation of the airway epithelial membrane glycoprotein Muc1 and activates MAP kinase. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 287:L809-L815.
  61. Wang H, Lillehoj EP, Kim KC (2004) MUC1 tyrosine phosphorylation activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 321:448-454.
  62. Ahn MH, Kang CM, Park CS, Park SJ, Rhim T, Yoon PO, Chang HS, Kim SH, Kyono H, Kim KC (2005) Titanium dioxide particle-induced goblet cell metaplasia: Role of mast cells and IL-13. Respir Res 6:34.
  63. Chaturvedi R, Srivastava RK, Hisatsune A, Shankar S, Lillehoj EP, Kim KC (2005) Augmentation of Fas ligand-induced apoptosis by MUC1 mucin. Int J Oncol 26:1169-1176.
  64. Kuwahara I, Lillehoj EP, Hisatsune A, Lu W, Isohama Y, Miyata T, Kim KC (2005) Neutrophil elastase stimulates MUC1 gene expression through increased Sp1 binding to the MUC1 Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 289:L355-L362.
  65. Lu W, Lillehoj EP, Kim KC (2005) Effects of dexamethasone on Muc5ac mucin production by primary airway goblet cells. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 288:L52-L60.
  66. Lu W, Hisatsune A, Koga T, Kato K, Kuwahara I, Lillehoj EP, Chen W, Cross AS, Gendler SJ, Gewirtz A, Kim KC (2006) Cutting edge: Enhanced pulmonary clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Muc1 knockout mice. J Immunol 176:3890-3894.
  67. Kuwahara I, Singh I, Isohama Y, Miyata T, Kim KC (2006) The signaling pathway involved in neutrophil elastase-induced IL-8 gene expression. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 291:L407-L416.
  68. Croce MV, Isla-Larrain M, Remes-Lenicov F, Colussi AG, Lacunza E, Kim KC, Gendler SJ, Segal-Eiras A (2006) MUC1 cytoplasmic tail detection using CT33 polyclonal and CT2 monoclonal antibodies in breast and colorectal tissue. Histol Histopathol 21: 849-855.
  69. Lillehoj EP, Lu W, Kim KC (2007) MUC1 inhibits cell proliferation by a β-catenin dependent mechanism. Biochim Biophys Acta – Mol Cell Res 1773: 1028-1038.
  70. Kato K, Lu W, Kai H, Kim KC (2007) Phosphoinositide 3-kinase is activated by MUC1 but not responsible for MUC1-induced suppression of TLR5 signaling. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Physiol 293: L686-L692.
  71. Koga T, Kuwahara I, Lillehoj EP, Lu W, Miyata T, Isohama Y, Kim KC (2007) TNF-α induces MUC1 gene transcription in lung epithelial cells: Its signaling pathway and functional implication during airway bacterial infection. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 293: L693-L701.
  72. Kuwahara I, Lillehoj E, Koga T, Miyata T, Isohama Y, Kim KC (2007) The signaling pathway involved in neutrophil elastase-induced MUC1 transcription. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 37: 691-698.
  73. Ueno K, Koga T, Kato K, Golenbock D, Gendler S, Kai H, Kim KC (2008) MUC1 is a negative regulator of TLR signaling. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 38: 263-268.
  74. Mishra NC, Rir-Sima-Ah J, Langley RJ, Singh SP, Pena-Philippides JC, Koga T, Razani-Boroujerdi S, Hutt J, Campen M, Kim KC, Tesfaigzi Y, Sopori ML (2008) Nicotine primarily suppresses lung Th2 but not goblet cell and muscle cell responses to allergens. J Immunol 180:7655-7663.
  75. Kim KC, Lillehoj EP (2008) Translational Review. MUC1 mucin – a peacemaker in the lung. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 39:644-647.
  76. Guang W, Kim KC, Lillehoj EP (2009) MUC1 Mucin interacts with Calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand. Int J Biochem Cell Biol 41:1354-1360.
  77. Hisatsune A, Kawasaki M, Nakayama H, Mikami Y, Miyata T, Isohama Y, Katsuki H, Kim KC (2009) Internalization of MUC1 by anti-MUC1 antibody from cell membrane through the macropinocytotic pathway. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 388:677-682.
  78. Kato K, Lillehoj EP, Kai H, Kim KC (2010) MUC1 expression by human airway epithelial cells mediates pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion. Frontier in Bioscience 2:68-77.
  79. Li Y, Dinwiddie DL, Harrod KS, Jiang Y, Kim KC (2010) Anti-inflammatory effect of MUC1 during respiratory syncytial virus infection of lung epithelial cells in vitro. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 298:L58-L63. PMID: 20081068
  80. Guang W, Ding H, Czinn SJ, Kim KC, Blanchard TC, Lillehoj EP (2010) MUC1 cell surface mucin attenuates epithelial inflammation in response to a common mucosal pathogen. J Biol Chem 285(27):20547-20557. PMID: 20430889
  81. Shanks KK, Guang W, Kim KC, Lillehoj EP (2010) IL-8 production by human airway epithelial cells in response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates expressing a-type or b-type flagellins. Clin Vaccine Immunol 17:1196-1202 PMID: 20592113
  82. Choi SW, Koga T, Park Y, Trelore A, Kim KC (2011) TNF-a is a key regulator of MUC1, the major anti-inflammatory molecule during airway Pseudomonas aeruginosa Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 44:255-260. PMID: 20448050
  83. Ali M, Lillehoj PE, Park YS, Kyo Y, Kim KC (2011) Analysis of proteome of human airway epithelial secretions. Proteome Sci 9:4. PMID: 21251289
  84. Nakayama H, Kawasaki M, Horie I, Miyata T, Isohama Y, Kim KC, Katsuki H (2011) Anti-MUC1 antibody inhibits EGF receptor signaling in cancer cells. Biochem Biophys Res Comm 405:377-381. PMID: 21219855
  85. Hisatsune A, Nakayama H, Kawasaki M, Horie I, Miyata T, Isohama Y, Kim KC, Katsuki H (2011) Anti-MUC1 antibody inhibits EGF receptor signaling in cancer cells. Biochem Biophys Res Comm 405:377-381. PMID: 21219855
  86. Seagrave J, Albrecht H, Park YS, Rubin B, Solomon G, Kim KC (2011). Effect of guaifenesin on mucin production, rheology, and mucociliary transport in differentiated human airway epithelial cells. Exp Lung Res 37:606-614. PMID: 22044398
  87. Kyo Y, Kato K, Park YS, Gajhate S, Umehara T, Lillehoj EP, Suzaki H, Kim KC (2012) Anti-inflammatory role of MUC1 mucin during non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 46:149-156. PMID 21868711
  88. Kim KC (2012). Role of epithelial mucins during airway infection. Pulm Pharmacol Ther 25:415-419.  PMID:22198062
  89. Kato K, Lillehoj EP, Park YS, Umehara T, Hoffman NE, Madesh M, Kim KC (2012) Membrane-tethered Muc1 mucin is phosphorylated by epidermal growth factor receptor in airway epithelial cells and associates with TLR5 to inhibit recruitment of Myd88. J Immunol 188:2014-2022. PMID:22250084
  90. Park YS, Kato K, Lillehoj EP, Kim KC (2012) The anti-inflammatory effect of PPARγ is mediated through expression of MUC1 in lung epithelial cell. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 302:679-687. PMID:22268120
  91. Xu X, Bai L, Chen W, Padilla MT, Liu Y, Kim KC, Belinsky SA, Lin Y (2012) MUC1 contributes to BPDE-induced human bronchial epithelial cell transformation through facilitating EGFR activation. PloS One 7:e33846. Doi:10.1371. PMID:22457794
  92. Umehara T, Park YS, Kato K, Lillehoj EP, Kawauchi H, Kim KC (2012) Prevention of lung injury by Muc1 mucin in a mouse model of repetitive Pseudomonas aeruginosa Inflammation Res 61:1013-1020. PMID 22643830
  93. Park YS, Guang W, Blanchard TG, Kim KC, Lillehoj EP (2012) Suppression of IL-8 Production in Gastric Epithelial Cells by MUC1 Mucin and Peroxisome Proliferator-Associated Receptor γ. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol G765-764. PMID: 22766852
  94. Yen J-H, Xu S, Ganea D, Kim KC (2013) Higher susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in Muc1-deficient mice is associated with increased differentiation of encephalitogenic Th1/Th17 cells. Brain Behav Immun 29:70-81. PMID:23261777
  95. Lillehoj E, Kato Kosuke, Lu W, Kim KC (2013) Cellular and molecular biology of airway mucins. In, Review of Cell and Molecular Biology. KW Jeon (Ed), International Academic Press, Elsevier Inc., pp.139-202. PMID:23445810
  96. Kim V, Kato K, Kim KC, Lillehoj E P (2013). Role of epithelial cells in chronic inflamma­tory lung disease. In, Smoking and Lung Inflammation: Basic, Pre-Clinical and Clinical Research Advances . TJ Rogers, GJ Criner, WD Cornwell (Eds). Springer Science + Business Media, New York. pp. 81-98.
  97. Xu X, Padilla MT, Li B, Wells A, Kato K, Tellez C, Belinsky SA, Kim KC, Lin Y (2014) MUC1 in macrophage: contributions to cigarette smoke-induced lung cancer. Cancer Res 74(2):460-470. PMID:24282280
  98. Guang W, Czinn SJ, Blanchard TG, Kim KC, Lillehoj EP (2014) Genetic regulation of MUC1 expression by Helicobacter pylori in gastric cancer cells. Biochem Biophys Res Comm 445(1):145-150. PMID:24491543
  99. Kato K, Lillehoj EP, Kim KC (2014) MUC1 regulates epithelial inflammation and apoptosis by PolyI:C through inhibition of TRIF recruitment to TLR3..Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 51:446-454 PMID: 24693944
  100. Xu X, Wells A, Padilla MT, Kato K, Kim KC, Lin Y (2014) A signaling pathway consisting of miR-551b, catalase and MUC1 contributes to acquired apoptosis resistance and chemoreistance. Carcinogenesis 35:2457-2466. PMID: 25085901
  101. Kato K, Wang S, Lin Y, Kim KC (2015) Role of mucins in respiratory tract inflammation. In, Recent Advances in Rhinosinusitis and Nasal Polyposis. H Kawauchi, D Passali, R Mladina, A Lopatin, D Zabolotnyi (Eds), Kugler Publication, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. pp. 103-109.
  102. Lillehoj EP, Hyun SW, Liu A, Guang W, Verceles AC, Luzina IG, Atamas SP, Kim KC, Goldblum SE (2015) NEU1 sialidase regulates membrane-tethered mucin (MUC1) ectodomain adhesiveness for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and decoy receptor release. J Biol Chem. 2015 Jul 24;290(30):18316-31. PMID: 25963144
  103. Kato K, Uchino R, Lillehoj EP, Knox K, Lin Y, Kim KC (2016) Membrane-tethered MUC1 mucin counter-regulates the phagocytic activity of macrophages. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 54: 515-523. PMID: 26393683
  104. Kato K, Lillehoj EP, Kim KC (2016) Pseudomonas aeruginosa stimulates tyrosoine phosphorylation of and TLR5 association with the MUC1 cytoplasmic tail through EGFR activation.  Inflamm Res 65: 225-233. PMID: 26645913
  105. Choi IW, Ahn do W, Choi JK, Cha HJ, Ock MS, You E, Rhee S, Kim KC, Choi YH, Song KS (2016) Regulation of airway inflammation by G-protein regulatory motif peptides of AGS3 protein. Sci Rep 6:27054. PMID: 27270970
  106. Xu X, Chen W, Padilla M, Saxton B, Hutt J, Kato K, Tessema M, Leng S, Kim KC, Belinsky S, Lin Y (2017). Muc1 knockout potentiates murine lung carcinogenesis involving an Epiregulin-mediated EGFR activation loop. Carcinogenesis 38(6):604-614.  PMID: 28472347
  107. Kim KC (2017) Airway mucins: “Aircraft carriers” in the apical surface fluid. A mini-review. J Lung Pulmonary Respir Res 4(4):00133. DOI: 10.15406
  108. Kato K, Hanss AD, Zemskova MA, Morgan NE, Kim M, Knox KS, Lin Y, Lillehoj EP, Kim KC (2017) Pseudomonas aeruginosa increases MUC1 expression in macrophages through the TLR4-p38 pathway. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 492(2):231-235. PMID: 28822766
  109. Kato K, Zemskova MA, Hanss AD, Kim MM, Gendler SJ, Summer R, Kim KC (2017) Muc1 deficiency exacerbates pulmonary fibrosis in a mouse model of silicosis. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 493(3):1230-1235. PMID: 28916165.
  110. Kato K, Lillehoj EP, Lu W, Kim KC (2017) MUC1: The first respiratory mucin with an anti-inflammatory function. J Clin Med 6(12). pii: E110. doi: 10.3390. PMID: 29186029
  111. Kato K, Chang EH, Chen Y, Lu W, Kim MM, Nihori M, Hecker L, Kim KC (2020) MUC1 contributes to goblet cell metaplasia and MUC5AC expression in response to cigarette smoke in vivo. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 319(1): L82-L90.

Summary of my major contributions to airway mucus research

Mucus lining the airway surface plays a crucial role in defending the host against various airborne particles entering the lung.  Particles are trapped in the mucus layer and cleared by the mucociliary mechanism.  Thus, the airway mucus serves as a kind of filtering system for the lung.  Such a role of mucus depends mainly on the quality and quantity of its glycoproteins called mucins, which are secreted by the underlying epithelial cells.  Mucins are multimillion Dalton glycoproteins highly heterogeneous in both size and electric charge, and contribute to the viscoelastic property of the mucus.  Therefore, abnormalities in either the quality or the quantity of mucins can lead to serious pulmonary diseases such as chronic bronchitis, cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, and asthma.  To date, there is not a single drug available that can control the production of mucins.  While working on the regulation of mucin secretion, we discovered that some mucins are present on the surface of airway epithelial cells as transmembrane glycoproteins.  We characterized the structure and function of these cell surface mucins.  These mucins were identified as MUC1 mucins originally found in cancer cells and shown to play an important role as an anti-inflammatory molecule during airway infection through a signaling mechanism.

My contribution to the airway mucus research can be summarized as follows.

  1. Establishment of an in vitro airway epithelial cell culture system for studying the pharmacology of mucin secretion

When I joined Dr. Paul Nettesheim’s lab (Chief, Pulmonary Biology and Pathology) in NIEHS in 1982, very little information was available about the pharmacology of airway mucin, mainly due to many difficult problems associated with both the experimental models and the mucin assay systems.  Although there were a few animal models of mucus hypersecretion available at that time, the ongoing inflammation in these models made it difficult to study the mechanisms of mucus hypersecretion and/or drug action.  During my postdoctoral period, I have been able to characterize in vitro culture systems for studying the pharmacology of airway mucin secretion (Publications #8,9,16-20), which was later reviewed in a book chapter (Reviews #15,29).  This was the first demonstration that primary airway epithelial cells can produce authentic mucins under appropriate culture conditions.  This was also the first demonstration that mucins are different from proteoglycans, which was a major confusion at that time.  My pioneering work on the in vitro system resulted in an invitation to a NHLBI workshop on airway mucin research in 1986 when I was in the Boston University, in which six other experts were invited to discuss about the problems and the new directions of airway mucin research.  There we emphasized the importance of the cloning of airway mucins, which became materialized through the NIH RFA mechanism.  The “first” lung mucin gene was cloned in 1990.

  1. Identification of the first mucin secretagogue using the primary cell culture system and the discovery of mucins on the surface of airway goblet cells

Using this in vitro system, I was able to show, for the first time, that mucin secretion can be stimulated by human neutrophil elastase, a major inflammatory agent present in the airway during airway inflammation, and that the source of secreted mucins was on the surface of goblet cells (Publication #10).  This totally unexpected finding was not accepted by the researchers working in this area, since mucins were believed to be secreted proteins, not the membrane proteins.  Since 1987, I have been continuously working on the cell surface mucins, as a side project (without any funding) until 1994, and then as a major project (two consecutive NIH RO1 grants) since 1994.  Briefly, I purified the cell surface mucins from the plasma membrane fraction of airway goblet cells (Publication #36) and cloned the gene of this transmembrane glycoprotein (Publication #31), which turned out to be the MUC1 gene, which is well known in the area of cancer as a carcinoma-associated mucin.  The function of this mucin in the airway was unknown, and has become the major focus of my current research.  I have been invited to numerous meetings and seminars to talk about the cell surface mucins in the airway.

  1. Discovery of a purinergic receptor P2u receptor) on the goblet cells as the most important mechanism of mucin secretion

Confluent goblet cells in culture secrete mucins constitutively (spontaneously).  While working on the mechanism of the constitutive secretion with respect to the Ge (G protein of exocytosis) which was proposed in mid 80’s, I discovered that ATP but not GTP can cause secretion of mucins from this system via a purinergic receptor-mediated mechanism (Publications #22,23).  Later, I elucidated the mechanism of ATP-induced mucin release (Publication #25), which was reviewed later as a book chapter (Review #24).  I also completed the binding kinetics of ATPg35S on the primary airway epithelial cells (Publication #28), which was, to the best of my knowledge, the first binding kinetics study for the P2u receptor.  The series of publications on the purinergic receptor and mucin secretion has helped me fully establish in the filed of airway mucin biology, which culminated through invitations to numerous seminars as well as major international symposia (Presentations #8,9,12,31-33).  I also wrote several reviews on the pharmacology of airway mucin secretions (Reviews #20,23,25,28,30,34,52,53).  In summary, I have made a major contribution to the establishment of the pharmacology of lung mucin secretion from the establishment of lung epithelial cell culture systems to study the pharmacology of mucin secretion and the discovery of the two most potent mucin secretagogues and the elucidation of their mechanisms of action.

  1. Identification of MUC1 mucins as adhesion site for Pseudomonas aeruginosa

More than 90% of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients die of pulmonary complications, in which the copious and tenacious mucus heavily colonized by Pseudomonas strains gradually obstruct the small airways.  The mechanism of Pseudomonas infection in the airway of these patients is still unclear.  We have recently demonstrated, using stable transfection of hamster Muc1 gene into CHO cells, that Pseudomonas can bind to Muc1 mucins through its flagellin (Publication #45,50).  Since MUC1 mucins have a receptor-like structure, we hypothesize that the bacterial adhesion to these molecules may be the mechanism whereby the epithelial cells can recognize the invasion of the bacteria into the airway.  The subsequent cellular responses to the bacterial adhesion are unknown at this moment, and will be the major focus in my competitive renewal to be submitted in 2006.  In an attempt to understanding MUC1 signaling, we have developed a chimera using genetic engineering techniques (43) and demonstrated that activation of MUC1 results in tyrosine phosphorylation of its cytoplasmic domains (57,60) which results in activation of ERK2 (47), one of the MAP kinases.  This is the first demonstration that MUC1 signaling involves the MAP kinase pathway.  A similar result was observed with activation of Muc1 using P. aeruginosa flagellin (50).  The discovery of MUC1 as a receptor of flagellin and the recent finding that flagellin is a ligand for Toll-like receptor (TLR)5 led to speculate that these two flagellin receptors may cross-talk during bacterial infection, which may be important in the regulation of bacterial infection.  Our preliminary results suggest that MUC1 is an anti-inflammatory molecule and this interesting hypothesis will be tested for the next five years with a new NIH RO1 (see Grants and Contracts #24).  Thus, understanding of the role of MUC1 mucin during the Pseudomonas infection may allow us to develop pharmacological manipulations towards the prevention and treatment of CF.  This new finding has recently been presented in several international symposiums (Presentations #47,49,62,72,74,88,93).

  1. Identification of a novel negative regulatory element that controls transcription of MUC1 gene.
    Over 6 years of struggle, we finally discovered a 37 bp segment located at about –1500 bp from the transcription site, which seems to be involved in negative regulation of MUC1 transcription (Publication #53). Our attempt to identify transcription factors that bind to this segment is currently under way.  If successful, this may allow us to control excessive MUC1 expression which is responsible for tumor metastasis, especially, in breast and pancreatic cancer.  While working on the transcriptional regulation of MUC1 gene, we discovered that Sp1 is a key transcription factor responsible for the increased MUC1 transcription in response to neutrophil elastase (65).  The signaling pathway responsible for the elastase-induced MUC1 transcription is elucidated in our recent publications (Publications #64,72).
  2. Discovery of the “first” inhibitors of airway goblet cell mucin secretion
    In collaboration with a Seoul National University research team, we have been able to show that some polycations can inhibit mucin secretion from cultured airway goblet cells without apparent cytotoxicity (Publications #29,30,51). These are the first compounds reported, to the best of my knowledge, which can suppress the airway mucin secretion without any apparent cytotoxicity.  Our preliminary study with an in vivo model of goblet cell metaplasia showed that these peptides are also effective in vivo (unpublished data), making them potential candidates for a drug to control airway mucus hypersecretion.  I have a US patent on the pharmacological activity (limited to its inhibitory effect on secretion) of these compounds (see below).  Furthermore, we have sufficient evidence that this peptide can also suppress mucus cell metaplasia or hyperplasia, both in vivo and in vitro, which is a major problem associated with COPD, asthma and cystic fibrosis (unpublished data, pending for a US patent).  This makes this peptide a most ideal candidate for controlling mucus hyperproduction as well as hypersecretion.
  3. Identification of MUC1 mucin as an anti-inflammatory molecule during airway infection

Using both in vitro and in vivo systems, we have first demonstrated that MUC1 mucin is an anti-inflammatory molecule that suppresses the inflammatory responses mediated through various Toll-like receptors (TLR2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9) (Publications #64,66,70-72, 79, 87; reviews #75, 88).  This is the first mucin gene product (out of 22 mucin genes so far identified in the lung) whose role has been clearly identified in the lung.  Furthermore, we also found that the anti-inflammatory effect of MUC1/Muc1 is not only for TLR signaling but also applied to all the other TLR signaling (#73), making it a major anti-inflammatory molecule during airway infection (bacteria, fungi and viruses).  Most importantly, the anti-inflammatory effect of MUC1 requires the cytoplasmic tail (CT) (#66) whose expression alone (i.e., no extracellular domain) was sufficient to exhibit the full anti-inflammatory effect of MUC1 (#73, 89).  Our recent finding that the anti-inflammatory effect of MUC1 CT requires tyrosine phosphorylation of the EGFR binding site on MUC1 CT (Y46) (#89) has prompted us to launch on a drug development project with the timely award of my recent patent on this topic (see below under “patents”).  Finally, the anti-inflammatory effect of MUC1 also seems to be applicable to autoimmunity based on an animal model of multiple sclerosis or EAE (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis) (#94).

In summary, we have enough evidence to support that MUC1 is a key molecule that is upregulated at the peak of inflammation to control excessive and prolonged airway inflammation following both acute (#75, 79, 82, 85, 88) and chronic (#92) bacterial infection.  We are trying to re-establish the mechanism of airway anti-inflammation by introducing MUC1 into the existing paradigm of anti-inflammation or the resolution of inflammation.  As an initial approach, I organized a major symposium on the resolution of lung inflammation at the annual American Thoracic Society meeting in 2008 (Toronto, Canada) which also continued in the subsequent year.  I have no doubt this research will make a major impact in our understanding of how airway inflammation is controlled during infection and likely lead to the development of a new drug to control excessive and prolonged airway inflammation.  This research has been the major focus of my lab for the past 20+ years.  A U.S. patent was filed in May 2006 for the use of MUC1 to control excessive airway inflammation as in COPD and cystic fibrosis and awarded in 2012.

Research Grants and Contracts Completed

  1. Evans Research Foundation (PI), Release of tracheal epithelial mucins in culture, 4/1/85-3/31/86, $7,500.
  2. NIH, NHLBI, HL-36854 (PI, New Investigator’s award), Release of tracheal epithelial mucins in culture, 7/1/86-6/30/89, $103,945 (direct cost); $155,918 (total)
  3. NIH, NHLBI, HL-19717 (Co-PI, program project), Response of the lung injury. Project #9: In vitro studies of airway epithelium, 12/1/86-7/31/90, $561,753 (direct cost).
  4. Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (PI), Airway epithelial mucin secretion: A model system, 4/1/89-8/31/91, $64,800.
  5. Evans Research Foundation (PI), Cell shape and secretion, 8/1/90-11/31/91, $70,000.
  6. University of Maryland School of Pharmacy (Startup fund), 6/1/90, $45,000.
  7. NIH, NHLBI, RO1 HL 47125 (PI), Regulation of airway goblet cell mucin release in vitro, 1/1/91-12/31/93, $442,349 (direct cost);$663,523 (total). 4.0 percentile (mucin release through the P2Y2 receptor)
  8. University of Maryland Graduate School (DRIF for GRA), ATP-induced mucin release from cultured airway goblet cells, 9/1/91-6/30/92, $9,600.
  9. NIH, NHLBI, S15 HL49362 (PI), Small instrumentation grant program, 9/1/92-8/31/93, $10,860 (direct cost)
  10. University of Maryland BRSG fund (Co-PI), Effect of mucus on transepithelial transport of albuterol, 5/1/93-4/30/94, $10,000.
  11. NIH, NHLBI, 2RO1 HL 47125 (PI), mucins on the surface of cultured airway goblet cells, 1/1//94-12/31/96, $433,859 (direct cost), $650,788 (total)
  12. University of Maryland School of Pharmacy (DRIF), Immunocytochemistry of MUC1 mucins using the airway epithelial cells in culture. 7/1/95-6/30/96, $8,177.
  13. Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (PI), Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion to cell surface mucins of the airway epithelium. 12/1/96-11/30/98, $150,000 (direct cost)
  14. NIH, NHLBI, 2RO1 HL47125 (PI), Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion to cell surface mucins of the airway epithelium. 07/01/97-05/31/00, $468,240 (direct); $702,360 (total)
  15. Glaxo-Wellcome Research Division, effects of fluticasone propionate on airway goblet cell mucin synthesis and secretion in primary culture. 10/01/97-03/31/98, $27,500 (direct)
  16. University of Maryland School of Pharmacy (DRIF), development of a stable cell line expressing a MUC1 chimeric receptor. 7/1/99-6/30/00, $14,500
  17. NIH, NHLBI, RO1 HL63742 (PI), “Negative regulatory element of hamster Muc1 promoter.” 2/1/00-01/31/04, $479,436 (direct); $719,154 (total)
  18. University of Maryland School of Pharmacy (DRIF), an equipment grant. 7/1/00-6/63/01, $25,000
  19. Maryland Industrial Partnership grant (MIPS) (PI), airway mucus secretion inhibitors. 08/01/00-07/31/01, $95,783 (direct)
  20. Maryland Industrial Partnership grant (MIPS) (PI), Airway mucus secretion inhibitors. Renewal application, 8/1/01-7/31/02, $134,603 (direct)
  21. Cystic Fibrosis Foundation RFA (PI), Role of MUC1 mucin in Pseudomonas infection. 03/01/01-02/28/04, $352,419 (direct)
  22. NIH, NHLBI, 2RO1 HL47125 (PI), Signaling mechanism of MUC1 mucin. 6/01/01-5/31/06, $800,000 (direct cost); $1,680,000 (total). 3.9 percentile.
  23. Reckitt Benckiser (PI) Effect of Guaifenesin on the production and secretion of airway mucins in vitro. 11/12/08 – 6/30/09, $116,500.
  24. NIH NHLBI, R21 AI073988 (PI) Role of MUC1 in the genesis of allergic asthma. 07/01/09-06/30/11, $275,000 (direct); $440,000 (total)
  25. NIH, NHLBI, 1RO1 HL081825-01 (PI) Anti-inflammatory role of MUC1 mucin. 2/1/07-12/31/12, $1,000,000 (direct); $1,800,000 (total). 3 percentile.
  26. NIH, NHLBI, 2RO1 HL47125 (PI), Regulation of MUC1 during airway inflammation. 4/1/06-3/31/11, $1,250,000 (direct); $2,300,000 (total). 5.0 percentile.
  27. NIH NIEHS, R01 ES017328, Co-I (10%) (PI: Yong Lin) Bridging Inflammation & cigarette smoke-associated Lung Carcinogenesis by Muc1.  08/09/10 – 03/31/15, $150,000 (total).
  28. Biostrategy Partners, PI (20%). Development of MUC1 mimetic peptides with anti-inflammatory activity. 09/26/2014 – 03/26/2015, $60,000 (direct)
  29. NIH, NHLBI, 2RO1 HL47125-24 (PI), Mechanism of anti-inflammatory role of MUC1 during bacterial infection. 09/01/12-06/30/17 (NCE), $1,000,000 (direct); $1,700,000 (total)

My lung mucus research was funded continuously (without any interruption) for 41 years by NIH since 1986 as the Principle Investigator (PI) – starting from a New Investigator’s Award and maintaining as R01’s (independent research grants) till 2017.

Invited speakers since 1987 (outside of my own institutions)

  1. The international mucus symposium, Manchester, U.K., July 1987
    Invited as one of the four speakers on lung mucus (led by Dr. Lynn Reid at Harvard) and presented the first discovery of the cell surface mucin releasable by human neutrophil elastase, which later turned out to be MUC1 mucin, a cancer antigen as well as a receptor for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a major killer in cystic fibrosis. This epithelial cell surface mucin has become the main focus of my research for the past 20+ years.
  2. Airway mucin symposium, Nancy, France, August 1988
    Organized by Dr. Edit Puchelle, Director of the INSERM in Nancy. In this meeting, I first presented the hydrophobic property of airway mucins with analysis of lipids tightly associated with mucins.  This finding has served as the basis for using detergents in purifying airway mucins.
  3. European Respiratory Society meeting, Lausanne, Switzerland, September 1988
    Presented the first observation that mechanical strain can cause mucin release in cultured airway epithelial cells. This has led to the currently well-established theory that mechanical strain releases ATP/UTP which stimulates release of mucin and chloride by acting on P2Y2 receptors on airway epithelial cells.
  4. Seminar at National Institute of Digestive Diseases and Kidney (NIDDK), NIH (hosted by Dr. Harvey Pollard), March 1989
  5. Seminar at the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, NIH (hosted by Dr. James Shelhaimer, Head of Division of Critical Care and Medicine), September 1989
  6. The lung cell biology symposium, Seoul, Korea, April 1990.

This is the first lung cell biology symposium held for the pulmonary physicians in Korea with a support by the Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases.  Professor Dong Soon Kim, M.D., Ph.D. (the Inje Medical School) and myself organized this historic symposium with an intention to educate and stimulate young Korean pulmonary physicians in the basic research on lung cells.  Professors Jerry Brody and Mary Williams were among key speakers at the symposium.  The impact of the symposium was dramatic and became almost a historical landmark.  For example, the number of Korean attendants in the following American Thoracic Society (ATS) meeting increased from less than 10 in the previous years to over 50.  A great number of young Korean pulmonary physicians have been trained in the U.S. ever since.  Currently more than 100 Korean pulmonary physicians attend the ATS meeting annually.  Given the incredible amount of clinical duties the Korean physicians are facing in their daily life, this is a significant progress for the pulmonary physicians in Korea.  This symposium is one of my major contributions to the Korean pulmonary society.

  1. Transatlantic Airway Conference, Key Biscayne, Florida, January 1991.
  2. Combined seminar series between the Department of Physiology and the Pulmonary Division, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, February 1991

This is a top quality seminar series, which is designed to facilitate communication between the basic scientists and the clinical researchers with a focus on various pulmonary diseases.  This seminar series has served as an invaluable resource for my mucus research.  I have been invited every other year to provide recent progress in airway mucus research including my own research.

  1. Laboratory of Pulmonary Pathobiology Seminar Series, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, April 1991.
  2. Thomas L. Petty Aspen Lung Conference, “Airway epithelial cell biology,” Aspen, Colorado, June 1991.

Invited to present my new discovery of the P2u (now P2Y2) receptor on airway goblet cells, activation of which resulted in mucus secretion.  Since then, this P2Y2 receptor on lung cells has been extensively studied in conjunction with cystic fibrosis mainly by a UNC group.  This discovery of ATP-induced mucin secretion resulted in a NIH RO1 funding in 1991 with a priority score of 5%.

  1. Asthma Center, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, June 1991.
  2. The Lung Cell Biology Conference, “Signal transduction in lung cells,” Woods Hole, Massachusetts, October 1991

This is the first lung cell biology meeting in the world that dealt with signal transduction, in which I presented mechanisms of mucus secretion induced by activation of the P2u receptor.  The contents of the conference was later published as one of the volumes in the most prestigious series on pulmonary research, entitled “Lung Biology in Health and Disease.”

  1. Inserm U 314 (host, Dr. Edith Puchelle, Director), Reims, France, June 1992.

Presented a special seminar, “Regulation of airway goblet cell mucin release: From microscopic observations to purinergic receptors.”  Dr. Edith Puchelle is one of the pioneers in mucus research and also a leader in airway epithelial cell biology in Europe.

  1. International “Purine 92” meeting, Milan, Italy, June 1992.

Presented my discovery of the involvement of P2u receptor in the regulation of airway mucus secretion.

  1. Combined seminar series between the Department of Physiology and the Pulmonary Division, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, January 1993.
  2. Hoffman La Roche Pharmaceutical Co., the Bronchopulmonary Division, New Jersey, January 1993.
  3. Symposium on “airway epithelial cell inflammation and secretion”, American Lung Association/American Thoracic Society International Conference, San Francisco, California, May 1993.
  4. Yonsei University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea, June 1993.

Presented a lecture as part of their ongoing special lecture series for the Graduate School, for which I received a citation from the Dean.

  1. The first Bioscience symposium, Seoul National University College of Pharmacy, Seoul, Korea, June 1993.

The first symposium organized by the School for its alumni who have established international reputations in their scientific research.

  1. The Graduate School and Department of internal Medicine at the Catholic University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea, July 1993.
  2. Department of Medicine, Inje Medical College, Pusan, Korea, July 1993.
  3. Department of Medicine, Pusan National University, Pusan, Korea, July 1993.
  4. Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan, July 1993.
  5. Dae Woong Pharmaceutical Co., Seoul, Korea, July 1993.
  6. Mid-Atlantic Lung Triangle Conference, Hershey Medical Center, Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, Pennsylvania, November 1993.
  7. Mogam Biotechnology Research Institute, Seoul, Korea, December 1993.
  8. Korean Green Cross Inc., Seoul, Korea, December 1993.
  9. Mid Atlantic Mucin Conference on “Molecular biology of Airway Mucin”, Children’s National Medical Center/George Washington University, Washington, D.C., June 1994.
  10. Symposium on “Airway secretions”, European Respiratory Society Annual Congress, Nice, France, October 1994.
  11. Mogam Biotechnology Research Institute, Seoul, Korea, December 1994.
  12. Seoul National University College of Pharmacy, Seoul, Korea, December 1994.
  13. Symposium, entitled “Mucin: Gene expression and secretion,” at the annual meeting of American Thoracic Society, Seattle, WA, May 1995.
  14. Korean Institute of Science and Technology, Taejeon, Korea, June 1995.
  15. Seoul National University, School of Pharmacy, Seoul, Korea, June 1995.
  16. Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan, July 1995.
  17. Symposium entitled “Bronchial secretions”, at the 7th World Congress on Bronchology, Taipei, Taiwan, April 1996.
  18. International symposium on “Airway mucus secretions”, 4/18-4/20/96, Seoul, Korea, April 1996.

This international symposium was organized by Professor Kwang Ho Ko (Seoul National University) and myself with support from two Korean scientific societies, the Society of Applied Pharmacology and the Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases.  Nine outstanding scientists from five different countries were invited as key speakers.  The symposium played a timely and pivotal role in planting pulmonary research in general and lung mucus research in specific in Korea, and also served a major bridge between Ph.D. and M.D. among pulmonary researchers in Korea.  In addition, it turned out to be the first joint sponsorship by the two otherwise unmixable science societies in Korea.

  1. Symposium entitled “Nucleotides and lung cells,” at the annual meeting of American Thoracic Society and International Lung Conference, New Orleans, Louisiana, May 1996.
  2. Symposium entitled “Mucin genes in the lung”, at the annual meeting of European Respiratory Society, Stockholm, Sweden, September 1996.

This was the major symposium by the cell biology committee of ERS, and organized by Dr. Peter Jeffery (Professor at Imperial College, London) and myself.

  1. Combined seminar series for the Physiology and Pulmonary Departments, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, October 1996.
  2. Pulmonary Division, National Children’s Hospital, George Washington University, School of Medicine, Washington, D.C. November 1996.
  3. Seoul National University College of Pharmacy, Seoul, Korea, December 1996.
  4. Symposium, entitled “Molecular basis underlying inflammatory damages and phenotypic changes of airway epithelial cells,” at the annual meeting of Japanese Pharmacological Society, Chiba, Japan, March 1997.
  5. Symposium, entitled “Airway inflammation and secretions,” National Institute of Industrial Health, Kawasaki, Japan, March 1997.
  6. Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan, March 1997.
  7. Fujisawa Pharmaceutical Co., Tsukuba city, Japan, March 1997.
  8. Symposium, entitled “Allergy Update,” at the 6th Pacific Allergy Conference, Seoul, Korea, June 1997.
  9. Satellite symposium, entitled “Anti-allergic action of steroid,” at the 7th Korea-Japan Allergy Conference, Seoul, Korea, June 1997.
  10. Special guest speaker in the monthly lecture series, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea, June 1997.
  11. Department of Medicine, Catholic University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea, June 1997.
  12. GlaxoWellcome Research Division, London, U.K., September 1997.
  13. Minisymposium, entitled on “Pseudomonas adhesion to epithelial cells,” at the 11th annual North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference, Nashville, Tennessee, October 1997.
  14. Cystic Fibrosis Research Center, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, December 1997.
  15. Symposium entitled, “COPD and airway mucus,” sponsored by Glaxo-Wellcome Pharmaceuticals Inc., Duhram, NC, November 1997.

Helped in organizing this two-day extensive symposium, especially in identifying and selecting the final six speakers for the symposium

  1. Combined pulmonary research seminar series at the Department of Cell Biology and the Pulmonary Division, University of California, Davis, California, January 1998.
  2. Samsung Biological Sciences Research Center, Seoul, Korea, February 1998.
  3. Pulmonary Division, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea, February 1998.
  4. A joint seminar by Department of Pharmacology and Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea, February 1998.
  5. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea, February 1998.
  6. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, March 1998.
  7. Pulmonary Diseases Group, GlaxoWellcome Research Center, Stevenage, U.K., June 1998.
  8. Department of Pharmacology, Imperial College, London, U.K., August 1998.
  9. Pulmonary Drug Development Division, Bristol-Myers-Squibb, Princeton, New Jersey, October 1998.
  10. Department of Medicine, Soon Chun Hyang University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea, December 1998.
  11. A keynote speaker at “the Winter Symposium on Airway Inflammation,” by Korean Society of Asthma and Allergy, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea, December 1998.
  12. Combined seminar series between the Department of Physiology and the Pulmonary Division, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, October 1999.
  13. “International symposium on mucus and cilia.” Similone, Italy, November 1999.
  14. Department of Medicine, Pusan University College of Medicine, Pusan, Korea, December 1999.
  15. The regional meeting of the Korean Society of Asthma and Allergy, Seoul, Korea, December 1999.
  16. Department of Medicine, Soon Chun Hyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea, August 2000
  17. The 6th International workshop on carcinoma-associated mucins, Cambridge, UK, July 2000.
  18. Department of Physiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, November, 2000.
  19. Cystic fibrosis conference, Williamsburg, VA, June 2001.
  20. Inserm U514 (hosted by Dr. Edith Puchelle, Director), Reims, France, July 2001.
  21. Johns Hopkins Pulmonary/Physiology combined seminar series, Baltimore, MD, October 2001.
  22. Symposium, “Pulmonary cell biology”, Boston University Pulmonary Center

Boston, MA, November 2001.

  1. GlaxoSmithCline Research Institute of Japan, Tsucuba City, Japan, March 2002.
  2. The annual Japanese Pharmacological Society meeting, Kumamoto, Japan, March 2002
  3. National Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Genetic Engineering, Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Preventive Medicine Institute of Virology, Beijing, China, March 2002.
  4. The Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing, China, March 2002.
  5. Department of Respiratory Diseases, The Xi Yuan Hospital of Chinese Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China, March 2002.
  6. Sun Chun Hyang University Hospital Division of Pulmonary Diseases and Allergy, Seoul, Korea, March 2002.
  7. Busan University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea, March 2002.
  8. Chunnam University Department of Internal Medicine, Kwangjoo, Korea, April 2002.
  9. Symposium, Annual American Thoracic Society Meeting, Atlanta, GA, May 2002
  10. Symposium, Annual American Thoracic Society meeting, Atlanta, GA, May 2002

Seoul National University College of Pharmacy, Seoul, Korea, September 2002

  1. Soon Chun Hyang University Hospital, Seoul, Korea, September 2002.
  2. Catholic University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea, September 2002.
  3. SNU College of Medicine Dept of Pharmacology, Seoul, Korea, September 2002.
  4. Korean Research Institute of Biology and Biotechnology, Taecheon, Korea, September 2002.
  5. 7th International workshop on carcinoma-associated mucins, Kriti, Greece, April 2003
  6. University of Maryland Baltimore, Immunology Research Group, May 2003
  7. University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Dept of Natural Sciences, September 2003
  8. Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Division of Physiology, March 2004
  9. University of Nebraska, Department of Biochemistry, Omaha, NE, April 2004
  10. The 8th International workshop on carcinoma-associated mucins, Cambridge, U.K., July 2005
  11. Oregon Health Sciences University, Division of Pulmonary Critical Care and Medicine, Portland, Oregon, July 2005
  12. Sophie Davis Medical School, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, New York, NY, August 2005
  13. Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute. Albuquerque, NM, September 2005.
  14. University of Southern California, Pulmonary Division, Los Angels, CA, January 2006
  15. Kumamoto University, Graduate School, Kumamoto, Japan, March 2006
  16. Kyung Hee University, School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea, March 2006
  17. Busan National University, College of Medicine, Busan, Korea, March 2006
  18. Guangzhou Medical College, Guangzhou, China, March 2006
  19. Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Physiology, Baltimore, MD, April 2006
  20. Chemical Institute and Industrial Toxicology (CIIT), Research Triangle Park, NC, August 2006
  1. University of Massachusetts, Department of Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine, Worcester, MA, September 2006
  2. University of Alberta, Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Canada, November 2006
  3. Gordon Research Conference, “Cilia, Mucus, and Mucociliary clearance”, Ventura, CA, February 2007
  4. University of New Mexico, School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Albuquerque, New Mexico, February 2007
  5. University of California at Davis, Center for Comparative Respiratory Biology and Medicine, Davis, February 2007
  6. University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, June 2007
  7. MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Houston, TX, June 2007
  8. International workshop on cancer-associated mucins, Cambridge, UK, July 2007
  9. Northwestern University, School of Medicine, Division of Asthma and Immunology, Chicago, IL, August 2007
  10. National Jewish Research Center, Divisions of Lung Immunology and Pulmonary Medicine, Denver, CO, September 2007
  11. Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Seoul, Korea, October 2007
  12. KRIBB (Korean Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology), Yoo Sung, Korea, October 2007
  13. Chonbuk National University, College of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Medicine and Asthma, Chunjoo, Korea, October 2007
  14. Washington University, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, St. Louis, MO, November 2007
  15. University of Miami, College of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, November 2007
  16. University of New Mexico, School of Pharmacy, Albuquerque, NM, December 2007
  17. University of Rochester, School of Medicine, Department of Microbiology and Division of Pulmonary Medicine and Critical Care, Miami, FL, December 2007
  18. A symposium on lung diseases (mainly COPD) between Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute (LRRI) and Harvard Medical School, Albuquerque, NM, April 2008

This is a consortium between the two research institutes to discuss the future research collaboration.  I organized this 2-day meeting with the support of Dr. Robert Rubin, President & CEO of LRRI.

  1. National Children’s Research Center, Washington, D.C., April 2008
  2. A major symposium entitled, “Airway anti-inflammatory circuit”, at the annual American Thoracic Society (ATS) and International Lung Conference, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, May 2008

This is the first major international symposium on the resolution of lung inflammation that I initiated and organized with Steve Georas, M.D., Pulmonary Division Head at U. Rochester.  It has a major impact in the field and was immediately followed by another major symposium with a similar topic in the following year at the ATS, organized by Dr. Bruce Levy at Harvard Medical School.

  1. An invited speaker at a lung mucus session entitled, “Sound of Mucin”, at the annual American Thoracic Society meeting, Toronto, Canada, May 2008
  2. Departments of Pharmacology & Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, August 2008
  3. Temple Lung Center, Temple University, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA

October 2008

  1. Harvard Medical School, Brigham Women’s Hospital, Pulmonary Division, Boston, MA, November 2008
  2. National Jewish Hospital, Denver, CO, November 2008
  3. Duke University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Durham, NC, February 2009
  4. Speaker and Session Chair, Gordon Research Conference on “Cilia, Mucus, and Mucociliary clearance”, Ilciocco, Italy, February 2009
  5. Department of Microbiology/Immunology and Department of Pathology, a joint seminar, Temple University School of Medicine, March 2009
  6. Japanese secretions society, a special lecture, Tokyo, Japan, April 2009
  7. Teijin Pharma Inc., Tokyo, Japan, April 2009
  8. Soon Chun Hyang University Hospital, Seoul, Korea, April 2009
  9. Pusan National University, Graduate school, Pusan, Korea, April 2009
  10. American Thoracic Society, a major symposium entitled, “resolution of inflammation” (Bruce Levy, M.D., organizer), San Diego, CA, May 2009
  11. Shimane University, Department of Medicine, Shimane, Japan, September 2009
  12. Japanese Rhinological Society, plenary speaker, Matsue, Japan, October 2009
  13. CKD Pharma, Seoul, Korea, October 2009
  14. Dong-A Pharma, Seoul, Korea, October 2009
  15. University of North Dakota, Graduate School, Grand Folks, ND, October 2009
  16. MedImmune, Gaithersburg, MD October 2009
  17. University of Pennsylvania, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Medicine, Philadelphia, November 2009
  18. Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), University of Pennsylvania, PA, September 2010
  19. Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM, October 2010
  20. Yonsei University Proteomics Center, Seoul, Korea, November 2010
  21. KRIBB (Korean Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology), Seoul, Korea, November 2010
  22. Guanzhou Medical College, Guanzhou Respiratory Research Institute, Guangzhou, China, November 2010
  23. Southern Medical College, Department of Biochemistry, Guangzhou, China, November 2010
  24. Sam Sung Bioscience Research Center, Suwon, Korea, April 2011
  25. Sun Chun Hyang Hospital, Pulmonary Division, Buchon, Korea, April 2011
  26. Yonsei University, School of Medicine, Dept of Biochemisty, Seoul, Korea, April 2011
  27. Sung Kyun Kwan University, Graduate School, Seoul, Korea, April 2011
  28. Annual Pulmonary Research Group Symposium, Philadelphia, PA, June 2011
  29. Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, July 2011
  30. Children’s Hospital of Pennsylvania (CHOP), University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, April 2012
  31. University of Heidelberg, Germany, October 2012
  32. Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea, March 2013
  1. Korea Green Cross, Seoul, Korea, March 2013
  2. Shin Poong Pharmaceutical, Inc., Seoul, Korea, April 2013
  3. Busan National University Hospital, Busan, Korea, April 2013
  4. Symposium on “Airway mucins”, Temple University, May 2013

As a satellite symposium of the American Thoracic Society International Conference (Philadelphia, USA), I initiated and organized the symposium consisting of 10 invited speakers from various countries.

  1. The 12th International workshop on carcinogenesis-associated mucins, Cambridge, UK, July 2013
  2. International Rhinology conference (Keynote speaker), Matsue City, Japan, October 2013
  3. Daegu-Gyeongbuk Medical Innovation Foundation, Daegu, Korea, October 2013
  4. Ahngook Pharmaceutical Co., Suwon, Korea, October 2013
  5. Dae Woong Pharmaceutical Co., Yong-in, Korea, December 2013
  6. University of Arizona, School of Pharmacy, Tucson, Arizona, February 2014
  7. Symposium on “Pulmonary Fibrosis”, Temple University, Philadelphia, August 2014

I organized this national symposium in memory of Dr. Gordon Sato (a member of the National Academy of Science) who encouraged and helped me during my final, rather difficult postdoctoral period in Lake Placid, NY.

  1. University of Arizona, School of Medicine, Tucson, Arizona, August 2014
  2. Pacific Rim Airway Mucus Symposium, Seoul, Korea, October 2014
  3. Soon Chun Hyang University, College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea, October 2014
  4. The 9th World Immune Regulation Meeting (WIRM) as a plenary speaker, Davos, Switzerland, March 2015
  5. Kumamoto University, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kumamoto, Japan, July 2015
  6. Daegu Gyeongbuk Medical Innovation Foundation (DGMIF), New Drug Development Center, Daegu, Korea, July 2015
  7. Busan University Hospital, Busan, Korea, July 2015
  8. Soon Chun Hyang University, Buchon, Korea, July 2015
  9. Guangzhou Medical College, November 2016
  10. 1st International Airway Inflammation and Mucins (AIM) symposium, Guangzhou, China, November 2016

This is the first AIM conference that I initiated and organized with Prof. Nanshan Zhong (Director of National Key Lab of Respiratory Diseases, Guangzhou, China) and Prof. Wenju Lu (Prof. Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China).  It was aimed at establishing international collaborative research within China as well as among China, USA and Korea.

  1. Arizona State University / University of Arizona, Phoenix, AZ, January 2017
  2. Virginia Commonwealth University, Institute for Structural Biology, Drug Discovery and Development, School of Pharmacy, September 2017
  3. Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China, December 2017
  4. National Key Laboratory of Respiratory Diseases, Guangzhou, China, January 2018
  5. Addis Ababa University, College of Medicine, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, September 2018
  6. Union University, Health Sciences Center, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, September 2018
  7. National Key Laboratory of Respiratory Diseases, Guangzhou, China, November, 2018
  8. Nanjing Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, China, November 2018
  9. International symposium on lung inflammation (plenary speaker), Northwest A&F University, Xi’an, China, September 2019
  10. Japanese Rhinologic Society (plenary speaker), Tokyo, Japan, October 2019
  11. Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea, October 2019
  12. Catholic University Graduate School, Seoul, Korea, October 2019
  13. Soon Chun Hyung University, Buchon, Korea, October 2019

Patents

  1. US Patent No. 6,245,320 B1

Title: “Inhibition of mucin release from airway goblet cells by polycationic peptides” Date of patent: June 12, 2001

Inventor: Kwang Chul Kim

Assignee: University of Maryland Baltimore, MD

  1. US Patent No. 8298522

Application No. 11//435,109

Title: “Methods of Modulating MUC1 expression to inhibit inflammation”

Date of issue: 10/30/2012

Filed data: 05/15/2006

Inventor: Kwang Chul Kim

Assignee: Kwang Chul Kim

  1. Filed on US Patent (pending; #12/555,518)

Title: “Method of Inhibiting Mucus Secretion”

Date of file: 09/12/2009 (currently under review)

Inventors: Helmut Albrecht, Kwang Chul Kim, Bruce Rubin, Jeanclare Seagrave, and Gail Solomon

Assignee: Reckitt Benckiser Inc., UK

  1. Provisional patent application (# 62152296; April 24, 2015) through University of Arizona.  Title: “Methods and compositions for inhibition of toll-like receptors (TLRs)-mediated inflammation”